“I don’t want to minimize the harm that Nixon did to the republic, but much of what Nixon did was also done by previous administrations, going back to at least Woodrow Wilson. One of the injustices of Watergate was that the Nixon administration took the full brunt of the blame for actions that had been routine under J. Edgar Hoover’s FBI for decades, and for domestic intelligence operations and other dirty tricks that traced back through the Johnson, Kennedy and Eisenhower administrations. Nixon didn’t invent COINTELPRO, for example, nor did he initiate the CIA’s secret mail opening program. What Watergate and the subsequent investigations revealed was that American’s First and Fourth Amendment rights had been largely mythological in the post-war era. The great triumph of the era was that America rose up and demanded that reality match the myth we were taught in our public schools. Congress enacted the FISA law, gave teeth to the Freedom of Information Act, passed campaign finance reform laws, created intelligence oversight committees, passed the Sunshine Act, the Ethics in Government Act, and the Presidential Records Act. Our country’s dirty laundry was fairly thoroughly aired through multiple congressional investigations, and the media became more combative and confrontational. The Bush administration attacked all these reforms in a fairly methodical fashion. I won’t list their sins here, as the archives of this blog offer one of the most comprehensive records of that history that you could hope to find. But the harm done to the country by the Bush administration was largely in eviscerating the Watergate reforms and heaping disdain and scorn on the values Americans had risen up to insist upon in the immediate aftermath of that scandal.”

robertreich:

We have to get a grip. Ebola is not a crisis in the United States. One person has died and two people are infected with his body fluids.

The real crisis is the hysteria over Ebola that’s being fed by media outlets seeking sensationalism and politicians posturing for the midterm elections.

That…

guardian:

Courtney Moore works at Walmart. She makes $230 every two weeks. Her monthly rent is $420. 

"I am on government assistance. I am on food stamps and I have to get government housing. I should not need that if I am a Walmart employee."

Demanding higher wages and better benefits, Walmart workers protested outside Alice Walton’s home resulting in 26 arrests.

the Waltons are scum with money guardian:

Courtney Moore works at Walmart. She makes $230 every two weeks. Her monthly rent is $420. 

"I am on government assistance. I am on food stamps and I have to get government housing. I should not need that if I am a Walmart employee."

Demanding higher wages and better benefits, Walmart workers protested outside Alice Walton’s home resulting in 26 arrests.

the Waltons are scum with money guardian:

Courtney Moore works at Walmart. She makes $230 every two weeks. Her monthly rent is $420. 

"I am on government assistance. I am on food stamps and I have to get government housing. I should not need that if I am a Walmart employee."

Demanding higher wages and better benefits, Walmart workers protested outside Alice Walton’s home resulting in 26 arrests.

the Waltons are scum with money guardian:

Courtney Moore works at Walmart. She makes $230 every two weeks. Her monthly rent is $420. 

"I am on government assistance. I am on food stamps and I have to get government housing. I should not need that if I am a Walmart employee."

Demanding higher wages and better benefits, Walmart workers protested outside Alice Walton’s home resulting in 26 arrests.

the Waltons are scum with money

guardian:

Courtney Moore works at Walmart. She makes $230 every two weeks. Her monthly rent is $420. 

"I am on government assistance. I am on food stamps and I have to get government housing. I should not need that if I am a Walmart employee."

Demanding higher wages and better benefits, Walmart workers protested outside Alice Walton’s home resulting in 26 arrests.

the Waltons are scum with money

“The prince fought valiantly.
He slayed the dragon.
The princess cried for days.
She loved that dragon.”

The stories fairytales don’t tell (via shy-fawn)

We tend to our own dragons around here.

(via foulmouthedliberty)

(via foulmouthedliberty)

foulmouthedliberty:

booksandotherdrugs:

(x)

This would be a brilliant sign for a liquor store.

“The idea is that since the main goal of all private corporations is to make money, they’ll be much more willing than the government is to cut costs and eliminate waste. The result, conservatives and libertarians say, will be more efficient, responsible, and responsive services. That’s the theory, at least. In reality, privatization of public services has been a total disaster wherever it’s been tried. And, as a new report from the Center for Media and Democracy shows, it’s also created huge opportunities for fraud and corruption. The report, which was released today and is titled “Pay to Prey,” focuses on how Republican governors in states all across the country used the cover of privatization to enrich campaign donors and political cronies. The worst culprits include some the biggest names in Republican politics.”
“As the youngest winner of the Nobel Peace Prize, it’s difficult to think of who could inspire Malala Yousafzai, the Pakistani education advocate who has become a global icon for girls’ education. But there’s one teen girl who inspires her.

At 18 years old, Anoyara Khatun from India’s West Bengal has helped reunite more than 180 trafficked children with their families, prevented 35 child marriages, rescued 85 children from the clutches of child labor and registered 200 students into schools, according to the Malala Fund.”

Well, here’s what happened. The city council passed a law protecting minorities from getting fired just for being minorities. Specifically, the city’s new law protects LGBT people from employment discrimination.

The CEO doesn’t like this law. What’s more, he thinks most people in the city don’t like it either. It’s quite possible he’s right about that. After all, laws protecting minorities from being treated unfairly wouldn’t ever come up in the first place unless it weren’t the case that a big chunk of the majority population was inclined to treat them unfairly. It’s often the case that a majority of the majority doesn’t like it when the law keeps them from taking advantage of a small minority.

But the CEO was so sure that a majority of the people of the city saw things his way that he launched a petition drive to force a ballot initiative that would allow the people of the city, by direct vote, to overrule their elected council and repeal the anti-discrimination law.

I will now pause to allow you to decide for yourself whether or not this CEO is the Good Guy in this story.